About Llanishen Local History Society


Our society was founded by a number of Llanishen residents in 1990. Their aim was to share their knowledge of the history of this beautiful part of north Cardiff with others. Our meetings are always full and we are fortunate to be visited by many different and fascinating speakers discussing a wide variety of topics.

 

We have created a number of publications, including our leaflet, the "Llanishen Village Trail". In March 2006 the Society released a video documentary filmed during Cardiff's centenary year - "The Village - Llanishen 2005", a journey through sites of historical importance in the village. Copies of this film are available on DVD via online request or at our meetings.

 

In 2007 the Society received, a grant from Awards For All Wales, a Heritage Lottery organisation, which enabled us to purchase computer equipment to "digitise" our considerable documentary and photographic archive, as well as to continue recording the constant changes in Llanishen. This has proved to be very successful and our volunteers now continue their work to secure the heritage of Llanishen. In addition, the computer equipment has enabled the Society to produce an illustrated lecture - "The Changing Face of Llanishen" - using our photographic archive. Please contact us if you belong to a society or group that may be interested in this presentation. 

In 2010 the Society began work on The War Memorial Project, which aims to record the service histories of all the men from Llanishen who fell in the Two World Wars. We also intend to find out more about the local Home Guard platoon and the experience of the American "invasion" of the village before D-Day.

 

Llanishen Local History Society continues to grow and we always welcome new faces. Why not come along to one of our meetings? Admission is £2.00 for non-members, or you can become a member by e-mailing us or coming along to a meeting. Membership costs £10.00 for a full year.


The chairman receives the Awards for All grant from local historian Brian Lee, September 2007